STATIONS OF THE CROSS

The Stations of the Cross in St Mary's were installed in 1992 as a memorial by Mr John Dawson to his father. They are ceramic, and though not fully three dimensional are designed to draw our eyes into the moments they depict.

 

Each day we will upload a group of images representing the Stations (from St. Marys) with an accompanying prayer below. Please feel free to print copies if you are able, rather than look at them on the computer screen. Some people have placed them around their homes so they can actually 'walk the walk' as they pray.

Obviously, any time of day will do, but starting around 12:45 or 6:45 should mean finishing around 1:00pm or 7:00pm when many thousands of Christians will be saying the Lord's Prayer.

You can view or download the Stations below

Station 1 -
View by clicking on the image below or download a copy for printing by clicking here.

1st Station.jpg

Station 2 -
View by clicking on the image below or download a copy for printing by clicking here.

2nd Station.jpg

Station 3 -
View by clicking on the image below or download a copy for printing by clicking here.

3rd Station.jpg

Station 4 -
View by clicking on the image below or download a copy for printing by clicking here.

4th Station.jpg

If you prefer you can download the first four stations (above) as one document by clicking here.

Station 5 -
View by clicking on the image below or download a copy for printing by clicking here.

5th Station.jpg

Station 6 -
View by clicking on the image below or download a copy for printing by clicking here.

6th Station.jpg

Station 7 -
View by clicking on the image below or download a copy for printing by clicking here.

7th Station.jpg

Station 8 -
View by clicking on the image below or download a copy for printing by clicking here.

8th Station.jpg

If you prefer you can download the second four stations (above) as one document by clicking here.

Station 9 -
View by clicking on the image below or download a copy for printing by clicking here.

9th Station.jpg

Station 10 -
View by clicking on the image below or download a copy for printing by clicking here.

10th Station.jpg

Station 11 -
View by clicking on the image below or download a copy for printing by clicking here.

11th Station.jpg

Station 12 -
View by clicking on the image below or download a copy for printing by clicking here.

12th Station.jpg

If you prefer you can download the third four stations (above) as one document by clicking here.

Station 13 -
View by clicking on the image below or download a copy for printing by clicking here.

13th Station.jpg

Station 14 -
View by clicking on the image below or download a copy for printing by clicking here.

14th Station.jpg

If you prefer you can download the final two stations (above) as one document by clicking here.

What are the Stations of the Cross?

The Stations of the Cross originated in pilgrimage to Jerusalem and a desire to reproduce the Via Dolorosa. Imitating holy places was not a new concept. For example, the religious complex of Santo Stefano in Bologna, Italy, replicated the Church of the Holy Sepulchre and other religious sites, including Mount of Olives and Valley of Josaphat.

 

After the siege of 1187, Jerusalem fell to the forces of Saladin, the first sultan of Egypt and Syria. Forty years later Franciscans were allowed back into the Holy Land. Their founder, Saint Francis of Assisi, held the Passion of Christ in special veneration and is said to have been the first person to receive stigmata. In 1217, St. Francis also founded the Custody of the Holy Land to guard and promote the devotion to holy places. Their efforts were recognized when Franciscans were officially proclaimed custodians of holy places by Pope Clement VI in 1342. Although several travellers who visited the Holy Land during the 12–14th centuries (e.g. Riccoldo da Monte di Croce, Burchard of Mount Sion, James of Verona), mention a "Via Sacra", i.e. a settled route that pilgrims followed, there is nothing in their accounts to identify this with the Way of the Cross, as we understand it. The earliest use of the word "stations", as applied to the accustomed halting-places in the Via Sacra at Jerusalem, occurs in the narrative of an English pilgrim, William Wey, who visited the Holy Land in the mid-15th century, and described pilgrims following the footsteps of Christ to the cross. In 1521, a book called Geystlich Strass (German: "spiritual road") was printed with illustrations of the stations in the Holy Land.

 

During the 15th and 16th centuries the Franciscans began to build a series of outdoor shrines in Europe to duplicate their counterparts in the Holy Land. The number of stations varied between seven and thirty; seven was common. These were usually placed, often in small buildings, along the approach to a church, as in a set of 1490 by Adam Kraft, leading to the Johanniskirche in Nuremberg. A number of rural examples were established as attractions in their own right, usually on attractive wooded hills. These include the Sacro Monte di Domodossola (1657) and Sacro Monte di Belmonte (1712), and form part of the Sacri Monti of Piedmont and Lombardy World Heritage Site, together with other examples on different devotional themes. In these the sculptures are often approaching life-size and very elaborate. Remnants of these are often referred to as calvary hills.

 

In 1686, in answer to their petition, Pope Innocent XI granted to the Franciscans the right to erect stations within their churches. In 1731, Pope Clement XII extended to all churches the right to have the stations, provided that a Franciscan father erected them, with the consent of the local bishop. At the same time the number was fixed at fourteen. In 1857, the bishops of England were allowed to erect the stations by themselves, without the intervention of a Franciscan priest, and in 1862 this right was extended to bishops throughout the church.
 

[from Wikipedia]

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